Molasses live op Roadburn, foto Roy Wolters

Molasses live op Roadburn, foto Roy Wolters

It’s been five years since The Devil’s Blood´ Selim Lemouchi left this world behind. Five years since his band members played his songs, that had such burning force behind them, such otherworldliness and conviction. Certainly, there have been other bands and the spark of his creativity has been carried on but not until today has it fully become part of the texture that is heavy music as Molasses takes the stage on Roadburn 2019.

Editor: Guido Segers

Molasses unites the forces of Farida Lemouchi, Oeds Beydals, Job van de Zande, and Ron van Herpen with Marcel van de Vondervoort of Astrosoniq, Bob Hogenelst (Birth of Joy) and Matthijs Stronks (Donnerwetter) to create magic once again. The commissioned piece may have been long overdue and much needed, and the road towards it has been paved with memories and impressions shared in many interviews. Expectations were high among people who have been somehow touched by the bands The Devil’s Blood and Selim Lemouchi & His Enemies. By word of mouth, we know that the band felt the same. It had to do justice to the past, but also be new. It was said that Farida Lemouchi was quite nervous to take the stage again.

Molasses live op Roadburn, foto Roy Wolters

Molasses live op Roadburn, foto Roy Wolters

So, it is a new beginning, but not a continuation as such. It is a tribute, but not dwelling on the past and this is tangible during the opening songs of Molasses. Band members look at each other, at the ground, nervously forward as the music sort of reluctantly touches, explores and wanders. It’s the familiar sounds, but different, ready to explode. It’s a path to catharsis, of working through, as perhaps not has been fully done in five years’ time, until we reach a crescendo. After a good 35 minutes in the set, the music seems to explode and come loose, the musicians straighten their backs, stand tall and shake of the dust. And from then on the spark is there.

As the band unleashes a torrent of their psychedelic, hard rocking tunes, the venue shivers, shakes and starts to move. Farida lifts her chin as she chants with a soaring voice, supported by Oeds Beydals as the band unfolds, plays and enjoys. Its’ moment of transformation is captured perhaps, in the light flickering off Farida’s dress, which carries the image seen on the promotion material. It reminds of a butterfly ready to fly out again. Who knows what the future may bring for Molasses? The spirit is set free, and like the substance, it sticks to everyone it touches.



Deel dit artikel